Category: Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)

Recreation During Harmful Algal Blooms

Jump to: Children Pets Fishing Water Algal blooms occur most frequently in nutrient-rich waters during hot, calm weather. Many lakes and reservoirs in Utah are subject to these conditions during the summer and early fall. Toxic blooms in recreational waters can cause illness in humans and kill livestock and pets that drink the water. The …

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Health Effects of Harmful Algal Blooms

Jump to: Children Animals Symptoms Toxins References & More Info Harmful algal blooms contain cyanobacteria that can cause skin irritation, gastrointestinal illnesses, and in some cases, produce toxins that cause serious health impacts to people, livestock, and pets. You can be exposed to the harmful effects of cyanobacteria by: Getting them on your skin while …

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Protect Yourself During Harmful Algal Blooms

How to protect yourself and your family Comply with instructions on health advisory signs posted at waterbodies experiencing a harmful algal bloom. Stay out of the water and avoid any contact with water or scums if you suspect a waterbody is experiencing a harmful algal bloom. How to recognize a harmful algal bloom Harmful algal …

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Response Agency Resources:
Harmful Algal Blooms

Jump to: Recreational Health Advisory Guidance Drinking Water Response Plan Other Resources Harmful algal blooms (HABs) pose a threat to Utah’s water-based recreation, culinary water supplies, aquatic ecosystems, and agricultural and residential (secondary) irrigation uses. Multiple agencies manage and protect these uses and users. DEQ has worked with its partners to craft guidance to help …

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HABs Monitoring Updates 2018

2018 Updates Bear River Last Update: August 14, 2018 Last Sample Date: August 1, 2018 Big Lake Last Update: July 25, 2018 Last Sample Date: July 19, 2018 Calder Reservoir Last Update: September 10, 2018 Last Sample Date: August 30, 2018 Deer Creek Reservoir Last Update: November 21, 2018 Last Sample Date: October 18, 2018 …

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About HABs

What are harmful algal blooms (HABs)? Harmful algal blooms occur when normally occurring cyanobacteria in the water multiply quickly to form visible colonies or blooms. These blooms sometimes produce potent cyanotoxins that pose serious health risks to humans and animals. Cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, aren’t actually algae, they are prokaryotes, single-celled aquatic organisms that are closely related to bacteria …

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Harmful Algal Blooms Home

Harmful algal blooms occur when normally occurring cyanobacteria in the water multiply quickly to form visible colonies or blooms. These blooms sometimes produce potent cyanotoxins that pose serious health risks to humans and animals. Although most algal blooms are not toxic, some types of cyanobacteria produce nerve or liver toxins. Toxicity is hard to predict …

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Rules and Regulations: Drinking Water HABs Response Plan

What is a Health Advisory? The Safe Drinking Water Act provides the authority for EPA to publish health advisories for contaminants not subject to any national primary drinking water regulation. HALs describe non-regulatory concentrations of drinking water contaminants at or below which adverse health effects are not anticipated to occur over specific exposure durations (e.g., …

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Suggested Sampling Procedure and Analytical Methods

Cyanotoxin Sampling Sampling Details Handling – follow collection and handling procedures established by method or laboratory Lab Analysis – use lab-provided sample containers Containers – typically amber glass Quenching – quench (usually with sodium thiosulfate) immediately upon sampling if exposed to oxidants Cooling – cool on ice (4° C) immediately after collection, during shipping, and …

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Response Assistance

It is the primary responsibility of the affected Public Water System to prepare and manage potential HAB events. However, there are two principal State agencies; the Division of Drinking Water, the Division of Water Quality, and several subsidiary agencies that can assist in the response to algal blooms and cyanotoxins as described below. A. Division …

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Raw and Finished Water Monitoring for Cyanotoxins

Raw Water Quality and Treatment Plant Performance Changes Public Water Systems vulnerable to cyanotoxins should also monitor raw water quality and treatment plant performance for changes that may indicate the presence of cyanobacteria or cyanotoxins. Changes are listed below: Increased taste and odor Increased SUVA Increased pH Increased turbidity Decreased filter run time Increased coagulant …

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Developing a Cyanotoxin Management Plan

Steps and topics for inclusion in the Cyanotoxin Management Plan (CMP) are summarized below. In-depth guidance is located on the pages in the left-hand menu. If a surface water source is found to be vulnerable, a system-specific CMP should be prepared to guide operators on how to effectively monitor and treat source water, raw water, …

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Laboratories and Treatment Options: Cyanobacteria and Cyanotoxin Analysis

There are several options available for cyanobacteria and cyanotoxin analysis. As the needs of each utility are unique, so will your analysis methods be. In-house algae identification Algae Lab – Trained phycologist can identify algae to the species level and provide numerical count of predominant algae. Toxin analysis -Analysis can be performed in-house or sent …

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