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“Dear Donna:” Here to Answer Your Environmental Questions

Originally published November 12, 2014

By Donna Kemp Spangler

As the Communications Director for the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, I often get letters from constituents with questions about Utah’s environment. Some questions can be answered easily. Others require technical experts. Some simply don’t fall under DEQ’s regulatory authority. Here’s a sample of some of the more interesting questions, suggestions, and comments that have made their way to the “Dear Donna” desk.

Contrails. Image courtesy of nasa.gov

Contrails. Image courtesy of nasa.gov

Dear Donna,

“I’m concerned about the chemtrails being sprayed not only over our state but over the entire country. If you are not familiar with chemtrails, would you please take a few minutes to research and discover for yourself exactly how toxic these chemtrails are. When the planes are not too high the spraying apparatus is visible with a good pair of binoculars proving the trails are not contrails. Thank you for your attention to this matter.”

Dear Constituent,

“I appreciate your interest and will have someone look into this issue. As I understand from our scientists, these are normal contrails, but I will look into any scientific evidence to support their existence.”

Dear Donna,

“I am writing with an idea for moving the inversion air (pollution) out of the valley. The idea is to install giant fans along the Oquirrh Mountains. In the winter, when we have the inversion, the fans could move the air. Then when we didn’t need them for that purpose, they could be switched so the wind could rotate the fans to produce electricity.”

Dear Constituent,

“A variation of your idea about wind power to blow out the pollution has been studied before. In fact, a University of Utah professor has looked into this and found that it isn’t technically feasible because it would take all the power from the Western grid to blow away the pollution in one day alone.”

Dear Donna,

“I have been a little mift (sic) over the business of air pollution. Coming up with solutions to curb the so-called “bad ozone” is really a bogus suggestion…The division of air quality in Utah and anywhere else in the U.S. A. probably know of its ability to deplete pollutants in the air but feed the public false information and conclude their own solution by emission testing… Do you understand? You and the rest of the Utah Legislators have been duped and preyed on with panic propaganda. I don’t trust the U.S. government to regulate anything because they always want something in return.”

Dear Constituent,

“Accurately monitoring and controlling ozone in the lower troposphere is of paramount importance to public health. Ozone forms naturally in the lower stratosphere where it blocks harmful solar radiation from reaching Earth’s surface. You are accurate in your assertion of the cleansing qualities ozone has on atmospheric pollution…However, excessive ozone concentrations in the lower troposphere have very significant negative effects on human health.”

I welcome your questions and concerns. If I don’t have the answer to your question, I will find someone at DEQ who can help. Please submit your questions and comments to deqinfo@utah.gov managed by my Communications Office.

Donna Kemp Spangler Communications Director/ Public Information OfficerI am the Communications Director for DEQ and write a monthly blog post.

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Last updated: January 4, 2021 at 9:39 am
Categories: News