Category: Mercury

Get the Mercury Out!

Mercury is a toxic chemical. If released to the environment it can cause serious ecological and health problems. Often it is found in our offices and homes. Women who are pregnant or may become pregnant, nursing mothers, and young children are the most sensitive to mercury poisoning. Potentially toxic mercury is found in a wide …

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Assessment Methodology:
Mercury

DWQ has collected fish tissue samples for mercury analysis in waterbodies throughout the state since 2000. Since that time consumption advisories have been issued for 24 waterbodies (16 reservoir and 8 river sites). DWQ staff develop an annual fish sampling plan. Sampling criteria currently include: Sampling when a current consumption advisory is greater than 5 …

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Clean Air Mercury Rule

The Clean air Mercury Rule was signed on May 18, 2005. It targets coal-fired electrical generating units larger than 25 MW. It sets nation-wide caps: 38 tons/yr in 2010 (Phase I) and 15 tons/yr in 2018 (Phase II) and beyond (down from an estimated 48 tons in 1999.) Each state has been allocated a cap …

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Mercury and Automobiles

What You Need to Know Mercury, a silver-colored liquid metal, is extremely toxic to the nervous system and may impair the way we see, hear, walk, and talk. When spilled, mercury can evaporate at room temperature and the vapors cannot be seen, smelled, or tasted. In the environment, mercury can be converted into a form …

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Mercury

Jump to: Mercury in Products Frequently Asked Questions Sampling Data Additional Resources Contacts Advisories and Health Effects Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring metal found throughout the environment. It is a liquid at room temperature, combines easily with other metals and expands and contracts evenly with temperature changes. Because of these properties, mercury has been …

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Disposal of Lamps that Contain Mercury

Compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) are highly efficient. They use 75 percent less energy and on average last 7 to 10 times longer than standard incandescent bulbs. By requiring less energy, these bulbs reduce the amount of pollution from energy production, which includes the emission of mercury from coal combustion. Because these bulbs contain small …

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Proper Disposal and Recycling of Mercury

It is critical that mercury be properly disposed of to ensure protection to humans, wildlife and the environment. All local health department offices in Utah have containers available to collect mercury containing products from residents. To determine which region you are in check the Local Health Departments and District Engineers page. Please call them first …

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Disposal of Button Cell Batteries that Contain Mercury

Mercury was discontinued from regular alkaline batteries in 1996. Mercury is still used in button cell batteries in the types listed below. Do not place button cell batteries in the regular trash. It is recommended, to place the spent batteries in a sealed childproof container out of reach of children. Batteries are known to be …

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Disposal of Switches that Contain Mercury

The most common type of switch containing mercury is the tilt switch. Tilt switches are activated by a change in orientation (e.g. turning on/off the light in a vehicle engine compartment when the hood is opened and closed). The information below will: Help you identify products that contain mercury switches, Identify mercury-free alternatives where available, …

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Disposal of Flame Sensors and Temperature Probes that Contain Mercury

Mercury-containing flame sensors and temperature probes may be found in gas-fired appliances. A flame sensor or temperature probe consists of a metal bulb and thin tube attached to a gas-control valve. The mercury is contained inside the tube and expands or contracts to open and shut the valve. Mercury is contained in the probe and …

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Disposal of Gauges that Contain Mercury

Devices that measure pressure may contain mercury. Barometers, manometers and vacuum gauges all have a gauge for reading air pressure. Liquid mercury in the gauges responds to air pressure in a precise way that can be read on a calibrated scale. Many barometers, sphygmomanometers (blood pressure monitors), vacuum gauges contain mercury ranging from 100 to …

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Disposal of Thermometers that Contain Mercury

There are various types of thermometers used for many applications. One common type is the fever thermometer. Although Utah does not have legislation banning the sale of fever thermometers, most Utah pharmacies and grocers have pledged to no longer offer mercury fever thermometers for sale in their stores. All mercury containing thermometers and manometers must …

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Disposal of Thermostats that Contain Mercury

Thermostats are commonly found in most homes and are also used for commercial applications as a means of regulating room temperature. The photo at the right shows common thermostats and the glass ampoule under the cover which contains the mercury. Mercury thermostats should not be disposed of in the regular trash. The information provided below …

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Storage of Waste Products that Contain Mercury

Waste Mercury-Containing Product Handling and Storage Guidelines for Commercial and Institutional Facilities All employees who handle or manage mercury-added products shall be informed of proper handling and emergency procedures. Store mercury added products (fabricated products) in a designated area which is separate from solid waste disposal. (fabricated products do not include elemental mercury or mercury …

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Mercury Spills and Broken Thermometers

Mercury Spill Information Even the smallest amount of mercury needs to be treated as a serious issue. Care must be taken not to touch the mercury. Never use a vacuum cleaner to clean up mercury. The vacuum will put mercury into the air and increase exposure. The vacuum appliance will be contaminated and have to …

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