Tag: Lead

Lead: Division of Drinking Water

Lead can enter drinking water when plumbing materials containing lead corrode, especially if the water is highly acidic or contains a low mineral content. The most common sources of lead in drinking water are lead pipes, faucets, and fixtures. Lead service lines that connect a building or house to the water main can also be …

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Lead

Lead is a heavy metal found naturally in the environment and manufactured products such as lead-acid batteries, lead-based paints, leaded glass, solder, chemicals, and older water distribution systems with lead pipes, solders, and fittings. Lead is a persistent chemical that accumulates in soils, aquatic systems, sediments, and some plants, animals, and other organisms. Since 1990, …

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Lead in Air

Lead is a toxic metal that was once used regularly in motor fuel, paint, ceramics, glassware, and other consumer products. The phase-out of leaded gasoline significantly reduced vehicle emissions and lead levels in the environment, but it is still used in some aviation fuels and used or produced in a variety of industrial processes. The …

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About Lead and Copper

Lead and copper are naturally occurring metals that have often been used in indoor plumbing. Pipes and plumbing may contain lead, copper, or their alloys, such as brass; some solder used at copper pipe joints may also contain lead. Water, particularly corrosive water, can dissolve small amounts of these metals into drinking water. The potential …

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Consumer and Public Notification: Lead and Copper Rule

Consumer Notification Requirements Consumer Notification Form Each time a lead and copper sample is taken the consumer must be notified of the results. This is accomplished by downloading the Consumer Notification Form, filling out the results portion, and delivering the results to the consumer. In the case of non-single family residence structure, such as a …

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Results: Lead and Copper Rule

Calculating Compliance Sample results are evaluated against an action level. The lead action level is exceeded if the concentration in more than 10% of samples is greater than 0.015 mg/L (i.e. the 90th percentile lead level is greater than 0.015 mg/L). The copper action level is exceeded if the concentration in more than 10% of …

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Routine Sampling: Lead and Copper Rule

Lead and Copper samples must be collected and submitted to the Division according to your system’s monitoring schedule and Sample Site Plan. Failure to submit samples will result in a violation and 50 IPS points added to the systems IPS total. How to Collect a Lead and Copper Sample List of Labs Sampling Procedure Guidance …

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Sample Site Plan: Lead and Copper Rule

All community and non-transient non-community public water systems are required have and maintain an approved LCR Sample Site Plan. The Division has created an easy to use template that can be used and submitted through a waterlink portal account. How to Create a LCR Sample Site Plan Step 1: Create a portal account Follow the …

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Lead and Copper Rule

WaterLink Lead-Free Schools Identifying Lead Pipes Utah Lead Coalition EPA Lead and Copper Rule Read Utah’s Lead and Copper Rule In 1991 the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a regulation known as the Lead and Copper Rule (LCR). The LCR established a requirement for public drinking water systems classified as either community or non-community non-transient …

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DEQ, Schools Partner to Keep Kids Safe from Lead in Drinking Water

By Marie E. Owens   We have all heard about the lead contamination in Flint, Michigan’s drinking water. Some of you may have wondered if anything like this could happen here in Utah. While the natural water chemistry in Michigan is different than we have here, the major cause of that city’s problem was a …

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