General Permitting Information (Air Quality)

The Division of Air Quality is responsible for issuing permits for any operation that emits any contaminant into the air. Such permits will often set limits on the amount of a contaminant that can be released, the amount of material that can be processed, or how dark a smoke plume can be. Two different kinds of permits are issued by the Division:

Approval Orders

Issued by the New Source Review section, and have been required for most new or modified operations since 1969. These permits may include limits on both construction and operation activities. A person must apply for an Approval Order before starting construction or operation of any emitting equipment. An application is made by submitting a Notice of Intent to the Division; a guide for preparing a Notice of Intent is available to help describe the application requirements. There is an exemption available for small sources. The New Source Review section also handles soil remediation projects and sales tax exemptions for the installation of pollution control equipment.

For further information or questions contact Marty Gray.

Operating Permits

Issued by the Operating Permit section. These are new permits required by Title V of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, and implemented at the federal level by 40 CFR Part 70. Any operation that has the potential to emit 10 tons per year of any hazardous air pollutant, 25 tons per year of any combination of hazardous air pollutants, or 100 tons per year of any other air pollutant is a major source, and must apply for an Operating Permit. Smaller operations that are regulated by a New Source Performance Standard (NSPS), National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP), or other Clean Air Act requirement must also apply for an Operating Permit. A more detailed description of the Operating Permit program in Utah is available.

For further information or questions contact David Beatty.

Small Business Assistance Program

The Small Business Assistance Program was also created by the 1990 Amendments. The SBAP is intended to help those small businesses with all aspects of the permitting process, including both Approval Orders and Operating Permits. Some of the businesses that have been helped by the SBAP so far include automotive refinishers, body shops, wood furniture manufacturers and chrome platers.

Originally posted: May 7, 2018 at 7:21 am
Last updated: May 7, 2018 at 8:08 am
Categories: Air Quality, Permits